how to avoid a halloween hangover

What day do teachers call “the worst day of the year”?  It’s the day after America’s biggest candy holiday.  But if you think we’re talking about too much sugar as the cause of Halloween Hangover, please think again.  Sugar certainly can make kids “hyper,” but for the majority of children, its effects are not likely to last into the next day and beyond.  And forget about the theory that your kids are being difficult simply because they’re excited.  (Excitement would also wear off sooner.)  So, if it isn’t sugar or the festivities that are to blame for your child’s November 1st hangover, then what’s the culprit?   Take a close look at the tiny print on those candy wrappers and look for color + number.  Do you see things like Yellow #5, Red 40 or Blue No. 2?  These are the names for the colorings added to candy and other foods.  Synthetic food dyes are the most likely suspects when it comes to triggering behavior problems in children.  For decades allergists have reported that food dyes can trigger reactions like hives and headaches in sensitive people.  The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Drugs found that they can cause respiratory problems like asthma.  And researchers in many countries have shown that these dyes can bring about behavior and attention problems, even when a child only eats a small amount.   Here are some of the problems that have been attributed to eating food dyes – attention deficits, irritability, restlessness, sleep disturbance, aggression, and hyperactivity.  But what could be so monstrous about those colorful little confections?  It’s not like food dyes are...